Industry Voices

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Cindy Hutter Cavell

Cindy Hutter Cavell

Cindy Hutter Cavell | Engineer | Cavell, Mertz & Associates
“Radio.com. OTT services. Video on demand. The evolution of digital video and audio and the advancement of compression engines, digital modulation and cloud-based content-as-a- service have completely turned the way humans consume content (and the way it is produced) on its head. It’s now possible to watch anything on a smartphone, from blurry cat videos to multimillion dollar productions. Satellite and wireless Internet delivery of content have replaced counting license plates on family car trips. Interesting, throughout it all, that people still talk in terms of ‘watching TV’ and ‘listening to radio,’ even though it’s not necessarily over-the-air broadcast or the appointment viewing/listening of yesteryear.”

Steven Poster

Steven Poster

Steven Poster | ASC, National President International Cinematographers Guild | Local 600 of the I.A.T.S.E.
“I feel we are rapidly approaching the ‘second wave’ of digital development, and nearing a flux point where the entire chain of digital imaging is maturing to the point of being totally ubiquitous… New technologies are being introduced within that process, like high dynamic range (HDR), ultra-high definition (UHD), and the increasing escalation of resolution known as the “K-wars.” 4K resolution seems to be the de facto standard, even though the vast majority of consumers are not yet able to receive any 4K content in their homes. I’m even predicting that bit depth will be the next area of stiff competition, because that will really make a significant difference in image quality.”

 

Terrence Curren

Terrence Curren

Terrence Curren | President and CEO | AlphaDogs Post Production
“For the first time in a long time I am watching the emergence of a new technology that truly adds to the viewing experience, High Dynamic Range or HDR for short. Since Dolby first started showing this technology in early 2014, I could see the promise it held. Unfortunately, certain manufacturers who are solely interested in driving sales as opposed to giving the consumers value are marketing HDR as requiring 4K. Adding HDR to our existing 1080 universe would be relatively easy to implement. Adding 4K, as many are finding out, is very expensive and doesn’t give a return on that cost to the end viewer. As more testing is done, we continue to find that the human eye is far more concerned with contrast ratio than resolution. I’m hoping that in the next few years we can settle on a 1080 HDR workflow that allows the home TV to uprez to whatever new format is being pushed.”

 

Jackie Lee

Jackie Lee

Jackie Lee | Senior Vice President, Feature Services Global | Deluxe’s Company 3
“If I had to pick the most exciting developments in the world of feature post production, it would definitely be HDR mastering. At Company 3, we’re seeing a rapidly growing number of filmmakers who want to create an HDR master. Even many shows that don’t end up running in any of the few Dolby Vision theaters available, are working with our colorists on HDR passes for archival purposes. Doing so is about much more than simply ‘converting’ images for different display technologies. There are also many creative considerations involved in getting the most emotional punch out of HDR. The more you can learn about all this, the better.”

 

Stacey Lynn Schulman

Stacey Lynn Schulman

Stacey Lynn Schulman | Executive Vice President, Strategy, Analytics & Research | Katz Media Group
“Radio is a strong, vibrant medium. Unlike television, radio is still maintaining its reach and relevancy with audiences, reaching the most number of people daily. Collectively, we — from our sales people to our industry leaders — have to remind media buyers of the strong emotional connection radio has with listeners. Marketers and agencies are looking for more accountable ways of finding audiences, and radio must be able to segment and sell our audiences the way advertisers want them. Technology will play a huge part, specifically programmatic. Programmatic will make radio easier to buy, and allow radio to tap into what is likely to be a $40B programmatic and digital ad buying pool by end of 2016. At Katz, we’re excited to be launching Expressway from Katz, an industry-wide exchange for buyers — something no other medium has been able to accomplish.”